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half slave and half free. >> casting nims the mold of the great civil rights leaders he avowed action on series of issue from climate change to immigration reform. became the first president to use the word "gay" in an inaugural address. >> our journey is not complete until our wives, mothers and daughters can earn a living equal to the efforts. our journey is not complete until our gay brothers and sisters are treated like anyone else under the law. >> debt and deficit front and center he offered a vigorous defense of entitlement programs. >> we must make the hard choices to reduce the cost of healthcare and size of the deficit. we reject that they must choose between caring that built the country. >> like every president since fdr, mr. obama started his day early, with a prayer service at st. john's church. before departing the white house for the longest motorcades known to man for the rise to the capital. a star-studded affair. where else do you see paul ryan mingling with jay-z and beyonce who belted out the national anthem. >> the ceremony was over there was a stream of pomp and
rights and he was sworn in on martin luther king's bible, had those of us in lead civil rights organizations, their labor organizations. they're on the platform. not in a guest seat somewhere else, right there only the platform. and martin luther king's son. i mean, i think that he was saying america has changed. and we've got to deal with the change and let's start celebrating the change. >> so, i think he did two things. one, i would agree with you. he said that america is -- has achieved a certain kind of difference that it is different now. but he didn't say i changed it, right? it's that line. s, seneca falls, it is him naming each of the turning point watershed moments in american history in terms of how that change begins to occur. but then he does the thing, of course, that king did in the "i have a dream" speech. he goes all the way back to the initial social contract. he goes back to the nirinitial declaration of independence. he says that the basis of this is in the election, in his right to claim the victory as a ro greszive president. but the real basis for this go
. king worked with other civil rights lead towers bring the movement for equality not just for the south, but throughout the nation. >> i still have a dream. >> yes. >> it is deeply rooted in the american dream. >> mike: in 1963, dr. king brought the march to washington and announced his dream for all to hear. >> i have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of this creed. the children who will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character. i have a dream today. >> mike: the power of those words forced washington to take action and a year later, the civil rights act of 1964 became law. making it illegal for federal and state governments to discriminate based on color, sex, or religion. dr. king's mission brought him to selma, alabama in 1965. he attempted to lead a march to the state's capitol, but mob and police violence forced them to stop. that day became known as bloody sunday. >> somewhere i read of the freedom of speech. somewhere i read of the freedom of press. somewhere
are honoring the civil rights leader played a significant role in advancing american rights, human rights for nonviolence in civil disobedience. until his assassination in 1968. thousands of people, the tributes started with a train ride. this was the annual fee o freedom train. he played a significant roleamerican rights through non-violence, and civil disobedience in the 19- sixties. until his for thousands of people here in the bay area, the tribute to doctor king began with a train ride today.. kron four's rob fladeboe was among those aboard the annual 'freedom train.' >> long live the dream. and long were the lines here at diridon station in san jose for caltrains annual holiday hundreds of people packed a pair of trains from san jose to san francisco on a bright clear morning with not one but two occasions to celebrate. for some, riding the freedom train has become an annual tradition. others rode for the first time. an on-going >> we listened to his speech of viagra tree might think it is pretty amazing. it is history. >> i do not know about everyone else but i did not realize ther
grew up to be a civil rights lawyer. he worked for the independent congratulation of schools. in 1977, he became the first african-american mayor of richmond, virginia. he has served in the virginia state senate since 1992. only two active senators have served in that chamber longer than he has. senator marsh wanted to see the inauguration of this president on martin luther king day. mr. marsh is 79 years old. it seems unlikely that there will be an inauguration quite like this again any time soon. so for a day, henry marsh left behind the virginia state senate. the virginia state senate i should tell you stands at an even 20-20. it is equally divided, half republicans and half democrats. 20 on one side, 20 on the other. and while senator marsh was away on this within day while he was at the inauguration, the republicans in the senate decided to do this. surprise! we're going to redraw virginia's state senate districts with no warning, while you were out, we're going to do this. ta-da. the associated press says, quote, state senate republicans have muscled a surreptitious redraft of v
, gay rights, civil rights. there was a feeling in the way he framed on that platform it felt different to her. it felt different to me. that was your reaction as well? >> it felt different to me as well. we're all sitting around whether we're journalists or not. we're listening for things. from our own experiences. so when i heard the president of the united states say stonewall after saying seneca falls and selma, sort of an electric shock went through me. whoa, the president of the united states just woef in the gay rights movement with the women's rights movement and the traditional civil rights movement, but he didn't just leave it there. that would have been box checking, but in the next paragraph he talked about our gay brothers and sisters and equal treatment under the law, and that went well beyond what i think anyone even expected a president of the united states to say in an inaugural address one of their premier platforms for the american president to not only talk to the american people, but to tack to the world. while this was a domestic address, a completely agree with th
address and chronicles america's struggles for civil rights. i'll talk about the cultural impact of today's speech with jonathan alter and james peterson. stay tuned. you're watching the "ed show" on msnbc from washington. [ dad ] find it? ya. alright, another one just like that. right in the old bucket. good toss! see that's much better! that was good. you had your shoulder pointed, you kept your eyes on your target. let's do it again -- watch me. just like that one... [ male announcer ] the durability of the volkswagen passat. pass down something he will be grateful for. good arm. that's the power of german engineering. ♪ back to you. ♪ living with moderate to semeans living with pain.is it could also mean living with joint damage. humira, adalimumab, can help treat more than just the pain. for many adults, humira is clinically proven to help relieve pain and stop further joint damage. humira can lower your ability to fight infections, including tuberculosis. serious, sometimes fatal events, such as infections, lymphoma, or other types of cancer, have happened. blood, liver and nerv
chartered ride honors martin ruther king jr.'s birthday and his fight for civil rights >> martin king was for civil rights, equal opportunity and peace. >> we have come a long way, but we still have a long way to go. >> cofounder says this is the longest running freedom train in the united states. on its 29th year. >> it is good to have people realize that there are so many other people that also have the concern about having a more racially just society. >> a lianoid san jose's diridon started early. >> had it not been for him making all the steps he made and doing all the things he did, i don't feel like this would be possible. we wouldn't have the freedom we have now. >> speakers on the train tin collude teresa cox and u.s. marshals talked about the impact oned to's world. the route goes for 54 miles, the same distance king and a group of activist marched to the steps of the capital of montgomery campaigning for voting rights. today, the nation's first black president was sworn in for a second term. >> a double sell brought martin luther king h
that forecast and the rest of the weekend coming up. >> one of the great soldiers in the civil rights movement have died. the reverend led protests and committed his life to social justice and equality. he was a major figure in the community for four decades. we must give thanks to the reverend for his bravery, honesty, and righteous perseverance. the reverend was 89. >> baltimore county fire units were fighting a three alarm fire in a strip mall. this is on philadelphia boulevard. investigators say the fire appears to have started inside a chinese restaurant. the fire was upgraded to a heard alarm. -- third lot. >> the fire spread fairly rapidly, particularly in a restaurant where they have cooking oils and a lot of combustibles. that necessity as to upgrade the fire fairly quickly. >> the cause of the fire is under investigation. >> a bone marrow drive today to help those in need. the rector of the basilica of assumption in baltimore baltimore was diagnosed with leukemia in 2006. he has one transplant. doctors say that he needs a second transplant. the drive today is to raise awareness that
. and as it happened -- and i was involved in the civil rights movement when i was in my teens and 20s. i met dr. martin luther king jr. i was doing a play called fly black bird about the civil rights movement. i was a young student activist in that musical. and we sang at a civil rights rally where dr. king spoke. and after that, reca -- rally wa private meeting with dr. king, and i'll never forget that moment when i shook his hand. we are working >> good evening, americans, and welcome to "the ed show" from new york. any time republicans try to beat up on a clinton, it's always great tv, especially when they get whopped like they did today. this is "the ed show." let's get to work. >> for me, this is not just a matter of policy, it's personal. >> secretary of state hillary clinton rips open the right wing attack on benghazi. >> the fact is we had four dead americans. >> and knocks down hack -- >> because of a protest or was it because of guys out for a walk one night decided they would go kill some americans. >> -- after hack -- >> what difference at this point does it make? it is our job to f
and fail without controversy. understand, a lot of civil rights leaders from that era resist putting the gay rights movement within the civil rights movement. so i think when a lot of this has gone to pass, we will remember the bigness of the gay rights. >> was it a big speech? was it a partisan speech? >> well, it was both. it had elements of boat. let me agree with what cornell said. i couldn't help but notice the man who signed the defensive marriage act, bill clinton, opposed to gay marriage changed his position during the course of his presidency. >> every speech before 2004, looking for a constitution to ban gay marriage. >> i welcome it. what i didn't welcome was the most polarizing president that we had became more polarized. this was a speech for the 51% who voted for him. there wasn't much more for the 49% who did not. it was a speech that talked about collective action by the government and when you look at the biggest issue that we face of this era, it's the deficit. it's the trillion dollars of debt and the president didn't really talk about that. he talked about, we're
riots in new york city which launched the gay rights movement and linked them to other civil rights struggles. and now that the work is over as you saw a few minutes ago it is party time. coming up we'll get back and give you another insider's look at some of the festivities and preparations to make it happen. >>> the first time in 18 years the 49ers are back in the super bowl. if you were around here in the mid-'90s and 1980s, you know how wild the bay area gets with 49ers fever. this time something totally new for the 49ers and the nfl. you probably know by now, sibling rivalry, two brothers coaching against each other in the super bowl. we have extensive coverage tonight of the super bowl. jim kozemore in our newsroom. we begin with arturo santiago with the family angle. >> reporter: you could say john harbaugh has had bragging rights since they beat the 49ers on thanksgiving day in 2011. now that very same sibling rivalry will be played out on an even bigger stage, the super bowl. >> i feel like there's no losing in that family. and i'm sure the brothers feel the same way. but o
be there -- >> 70s? >> king would be there with all the other civil rights leaders who are in that moment. >> getting back to what you were saying, rachel, about the corporate profits, you know, the president believes in wall street. he doesn't want to be alien to wall street. he believes it is a vital part of our capitolistic system. he believes that government has a responsibility not to leave people behind and he also believes that those who have enjoyed the fruits out of our system should pay their fair share. and defining that fair share is going to be done by the population and the mood of the country and what we can do as a country to fix our finances. but he has been an allie to wall street. and he has tried to develop friends on wall street, which has been extremely hard for him, but if he can get these corporations to loosen up their profits and to hire people, then a lot of things would turn around in a heartbeat in this country. getting companies to invest here is one of his priorities. >> there's former president jimmy carter and his wife. immediately before them, as you migh
party had similar positions or even cared about civil rights i think it was 14% of african-american voters said that they would be more likely to vote for the republican candidate. >> there are changes in this country that they can no longer deny, and that's why you have people like ralph reed coming out and saying we can't stick our head in the sand anymore, and you have -- there's supposedly winter convention going to have skype training and google hang-outs and -- >> i think google hang-outs sound great and skype training sounds great, but i go back to what pribus said. we have a message that we don't actually have to change our policy, right? if we have enough google hangs we can convince minority voters, gay voters that we're inclusive, and, yet, you have the president delivering a message to the country on monday which was about immigration, gay rights, as civil rights issue, and immigration. none of which should be controversial. >> i don't think he believes they have to change anywhere. i think many are willing to change on immigration. i think you'll find more and
, avery friedman, civil rights attorney and law professor in cleveland and richard herman, new york criminal defense attorney and law professor joins us from miami this week. let's start with the class action lawsuits being filed against the subway restaurant chain. this is an ireport photo of one of the many that turned up around the world and the internet showing subway sandwiches that don't measure up to the company's foot-long claim. subway won't comment on pending legal action but did release this statement -- "for 47 years customer satisfaction has been our top priority. we regret any instance where we did not full fully deliver on our promise to customers." richard, how big a deal is this? >> miguel, does size really matter? does it really matter? does that half an inch or an inch really matter? >> it matters to somebody. attorneys out there. >> to somebody, that's right. >> it seems to matter. that foot-long, all those commercials with the song, well, they're not a foot long. they're 11 inches long or 11 1/2 inches long. it's not like mcdonald's who says, look, i got a quart
that are criticizing the president, it is civil rights rhetoric. they are the same republicans that would be criticizing jfk for dividing the republican ares back in the 1960s when they were trying to pass voting rights. >> they were democrats. >> there is one big challenge. reagan had reagan democrats and there is almost non existent in this country right now. and i think the way that he went through this address in a confrontational way sets up barriers for him. that was something that reagan was fantastic about. right now, obama has fractured capitol hill that not much is getting done. that is the challenge. >> we have to get out of here. he says the shrinking few do well while the growing group have trouble making it. and it isn't cleverly disguised. he won i get that. ramesh, thank you very much kevin and mark. top golfer complaining that he has a personal tax rate of 62%. because of the tax hike enacted in his home state of california. of course he is right on track. we have the answers next up. would define you as an innovator. to hold more than one patent of this caliber... would
to the message of martin luther king jr. on a day that the nation celebrates the birth of the civil-rights leader. >> tahir a preacher say we cannot walk alone the challenges ahead are enormous and the president admitted that his work would be imperfect. we must act that knowing that today's victories will be only partial grammy winner kelly clarkson giving the ceremony in central hollywood. followed by the friend of the president beyonce with her rendition of the national anthem a performance to remember. it all ended with a 21 gun salute before special guests attended a formal luncheon where the president and first lady had lobster, bison and apple pie before they took to the parade route in washington thousands of well-wishers lined the streets screamed and hollered into a magic moment when they got a glimpse of the president and mrs. obama along pennsylvania avenue the first couple had rock star status. hand-in-hand to the crowd went wild. one of the more emotional moments of the day action likely when president obama was just leaving the capital take a look he stopped and he turned around
his religion allows for something he said his faith opposed and now, he believes marriage is a civil right. in the past he flatly declared waits not. did anyone in the main stream media point that out? not a single person. these last four years and events have provided countless examples of the media shirking their response skbriblt not doing their due diligence whit comes to veting obama. maybe it's fatigue from veting. bush administration for eight years. in case you've forgoten how different the coverage was for president bush, here is a trip down memory lane. let's take a look at president bush in 2005 what. a difference. >> world news tonight, sunday, president bush prepares for his second inauguration. >> in a time of war, is it time for a lavish celebration sfl. >> do you think the balls and some of the excess are appropriate? >> many wondered whether, given the war... and all of our security challenges right now is it appropriate to have a lavish inaugural celebration. >> sean: someone pinch me. is there a doubt how biased the main stream media is when it comes to barack obam
to the bloomberg bomb's soda ban. some civil rights group think it will hurt minority business owners. could it be the straw that break the nanny state back? or the straw that breaks the soda? back in moments. we'll tell you. so you say men are superior drivers? yeah. then how'd i get this... [ voice of dennis ] ...safe driving bonus check? every six months without an accident, allstate sends a check. ok. [ voice of dennis ] silence. are you in good hands? [ voice of dennis ] silence. we replaced people with a machine.r, what? customers didn't like it. so why do banks do it? hello? hello?! if your bank doesn't let you talk to a real person 24/7, you need an ally. hello? ally bank. your money needs an ally. ♪ many hot dogs are within you. try pepto-bismol to-go, it's the power of pepto, but it fits in your pocket. now tell the world daniel... of pepto-bismol to-go. >>> i'm bret baier this washington. the big story here, confirmation hearing for the president's pick as the new secretary of state with foreign policy hot spots around the world. only getting hotter. tonight on "special report,"
with 128 in 2010 alone. the program's covert nature has alarmed civil rights activists and the human rights council has now launched an investigation into drone attacks connected to civilian casualties. joining us now to discuss the war on terror is the director of the aclu, national security project, hannah. thanks for joining us. >> thank you for having me. >> this is a conversation that i think gradually is taking more of a role on center stage. especially with the appointment of john brennan and as we look at john kerry and chuck hagel. in terms of u.s. national security and foreign policy, the get month trials, however, we -- there was a lot of discussion, a lot of hub bub when they were going to be in new york, but here they are beginning in guantanamo bay, and there is very little discussion about the fact that they are happening there. you guys have challenged the sort of legitimacy of these. the nation writes today "at guantanamo the government is still making up the law as it goes along. the military commissions are just one piece of a larger disturbing trend towards centralized p
presidents? >> the temptation is to say yes, although we are listening to several civil rights activists today saying it's not as polarized as when we were watching the march on washington. i think everybody has been saying to the president, in terms of legislatively strike while the iron is hot. and all presidents re-elected to a second term, it's right now, the first year of their second term. remember, the six-year itch, when you get to the third cycle of the congressional elections, 2014, generally the minority, the house of republicans are expected to gain seats because there's this six-year itch. the time to pass legs. is in the next two years and really this year. >> i will jump in and say there's so many x factors out there right now, the arab spring, i think we think is a good thing right now, we don't know. we don't know what's going to han in all these places across the middle east. we hope democracy takes footing but we don't know. >> and in a year or two we were talking about al qaeda being decimated and now we're seeing nigeria and mali. >> right, i think his attention is g
the civil rights float and a float paying tribute to dr. martin luther king. >> then you see the tuskegee air american float which pays tribute to the young african american soldiers which fought in world war ii, the first aviator military to fight in the war. >> these boys helped win the war and preserve our freedom that we have today. you know, i don't want people to forget that. >> reporter: along with the eight official floats there are 11 others commissioned by groups marching in the parade including nasa. look out for full size models of the curiosity mars rover and orion, the capsule that will take humans farther into space than ever before. >> the astronauts will be riding in that going on the next mission, so we have four, five or six astronauts that will be in the parade along with that. >> reporter: passers-by delighted to get up close with these works of art. patricia campbell says it helps teach her granddaughter about patriotism. >> the beauty of some of these floats is we can explain to her some of the things that our foreparents and those that have gone before us have d
men, women marrying women, they're entitled to the same exact rights, all the civil rights and liberties. >> that caused heartburn in the west wing. >> even the so-called discussion about you know, my saying i was comfortable with gay and lesbians and relationships, i knew his position. >> but you got out in front of him on it, and that is -- that can be a problem. >> i can tell you how i responded. i walked into the office. he got up, smiled, gave me a big hug, said tell you what, man, you say what is on your mind. >> you said it caused a bit of a problem here? >> it did, but not with him, not with him. >> lately joe biden has become the white house closer, cutting the deal on the fiscal cliff and trying to get one on guns. >> are you the only one who can cut deals with republicans now. >> no, no, look, first of all the only reason i would be able to close a deal is because everybody knows i speak for the president. i have his complete support for what i'm saying because i know what he wants, number one, number two, you know i think the reason we make a good team. tip o'ne
filibuster is part of the tradition. how is that the -- >> part of the tradition of blocking civil rights legislation, right? it's not like -- it was a fairly effective method of blocking all sorts of legislation. >> that's true. >> i mean, at the same time, look, the republicans what they wanted most and they have claimed that the reason they filibuster everything is that harry reid hasn't allowed them to offer amendments. to your point about filling the amendment tree. they got what they wanted most. now harry reid will not be able to prevent them from offering amendments. he will have to let both sides offer two amendments medical record to move a bill past the first filibuster, and this isn't the filibuster. this is just to begin debate on an item. i mean, i think republicans ms instance got exactly the thing they wanted most. i'm not sure what democrats got. i agree with keeping the filibuster itself because democrats may need is one day, but i think more reform than this was warranted. >> we have no idea where 20141 going to happen. there are a lot of vulnerable democrats that will
the pick of every darn civilization on the planet. >> right, pick work dogs, not lazy dogs from those donor countries. congressman king said later his remarks were meant as a compliment. charming. so there has been an evolution by the republican party and it's not because rick perry accused anyone of not having a heart. senator mccain, how about some of that famous straight talk? >> i'll give you a little straight talk. look at the last election. look at the last election. we are losing dramatically the hispanic vote, which we think should be ours for a variety of reasons. >> now, losing dramatically. i'm not so sure about that. mitt romney only lost by 44 points among latino voters, a hair's breath really. if republicans think the latino vote should be theirs, they may want to revisit their hardline party platform which reads in part, we oppose any form of amnesty for those who, by intentionally violating the law, disadvantaged those who have obeyed it, granting amnesty only rewards and encourageags more l breaking. there is no indication that the republican base is on board with any of th
's rights which later led to a women's right to vote, of course. selma, alabama, the city where civil rights denl straighters fought for voting rights for african-americans in the march of 1965 only to be met violently by armed state troopers in a day that has since been known as bloody sunday. and the stonewall inn often thought of the birth place of the lgbt rights after a gay bar was raided by police in 1969 and for days became the site of protests and riots. here is the president yesterday. >> we, the people, declare today that the most evident of truths, that all of us are created equal, is the star that guides us still just as it guided our forbearers through seneca falls and selma and stonewall, just as it guided all those men and women sung and unsung who left footprints along this great mall to hear a preacher say that we cannot walk alone. to hear a king proclaim that our individual freedom is inextricably bound to the freedom of every soul on earth. >> the iconic nature of that speech, we americans love brands. we love iconic moments whether it's the golden gate bridge or niagara
earlier that you made a point of noticing how he drew the issue of gay rights right into civil rights and across history even as he goes now -- >> and women's rights. >> and women's rights. >> and it was a beautiful thing. that's part of the legacy of what this president is overseeing. this major demographic and cultural shift in our country. for him to bring that in as part of the inaugural address, it was very important from a historical perspective. >> just as they prepare to sit and prepare for the parade as it passes the reviewing stand, vice president joe biden giggling and talking -- oh, no, they are now sitting because the president has decided to take his seat. i was struck also, ari, by this comment the president made about his oath. when he said, this is an oath to god and country, not to party and faction. again absolutely eviscerating what has been an agenda by his opponents not to concern itself with country but to pursue anything that he wished to pass legislatively and attack it for purely partisan reasons. >> yeah. i thought that was striking. i thought it was asserti
. and then the third element was his expansion of civil rights where he talked about immigrants and gays and even shoehorned gun rights under the rubric of the security. he outlined the liberal agenda, the big-government agenda of the future. >>gretchen: i think there were two words that came out of it that summarized what charles was saying was that the president yesterday used these two words: collective action. if you parse those two words, it could bring you back to how he started in his career as a community organizer. >>steve: bob schieffer from cbs said there were no memorable lines in this speech. i think what is memorable is what his political director at cbs said in offering advice in a "slate" magazine column to the president. go for the throat of the g.o.p. listen. >> this article should scare anybody who has any doubts whatsoever about the media's impartiality. he is the news director, political director -- excuse me -- for cbs news. he writes a piece in which he calls for essentially an antidemocratic action. depoliticize the g.o.p. action. he believes obama at to delegitimize. it
stonewall, along with selma, put it with the civil rights movement and a gay bar raided by police. this says a lot about where his values are right now on this issue. and it speaks volumes about where the country's moved. >> he also mentioned women's equality as well, women's rights. what is wrong with an america, a modern america taking a basic standpoint that all men and women should be equal, whether it's the amount they're paid for the same job, their sexuality, the color of their skin. i like the way the president brought it all together and said, you know something? actually, equality should mean that -- equality. >> he did sort of say that, but the one word he never said yesterday, piers, was gun or guns and we ought to put that on the record. there's a great reason he didn't say that, i guess the same reason he never bothered to revive the assault weapons ban -- >> i'm talking about guns all night, as you know. >> talking about president obama in his second term. let's be fair about his first term. >> do you have any exception to him wanting to apparently categorize as joe biden who
are listening to several civil rights activists today saying it's not as polarized as when we were watching the march on washington. i think everybody has been saying to the president, in terms of legislatively strike while the iron is hot. and all presidents re-elected to a second term, it's right now, the first year of their second term. remember, the six-year itch, when you get to the third cycle of the congressional elections, 2014, generally the minority, the house of republicans are expected to gain seats because there's this six-year itch. the time to pass legs. is in the next two years and really this year. >> i will jump in and say there's so many x factors out there right now, the arab spring, i think we think is a good thing right now, we don't know. we don't know what's going to han in all these places across the middle east. we hope democracy takes footing but we don't know. >> and in a year or two we were talking about al qaeda being decimated and now we're seeing nigeria and mali. >> right, i think his attention is going to be torn back to the middle east. it just will. my pr
into little rock. not into berlin, but little rock to enforce desegregation, he signed the first civil rights law since the civil war. he hardly spoke about that in the second inaugural. he mentioned it, but hardly. i think these presidents have no idea what they're about to encouldn'ter. >> and outside events end up shaping the legacy. the president's maximum political power and validation is right now in this moment and in the next year, and the question is, did he strike while the iron is hot, and take to the tendency which will be to appeal to the democratic base and try to ram something through, or does he do something which may be against his nature and try to reach out to republicans, work with maybe marco rubio on immigration, and try to have a real legacy. >> i think your former boss saying, i have political capital to spend and i'm going to spend it. do you see the same for president obama? >> i do. and the interesting thing is, mandates are that which you create as the president. you can create more and do more if you do well. if the economy comes back and you can convince people t
, the issue of choice is, in fact, wrapped up with women's reproductive almost -- these are civil rights issues on a lot of levels. how is a transvaginal ultrasound not a violation of privacy. >> i think with michael, i would say to you, i have read what you say about this, i do believe that republican values are sort of -- have -- they've lost hold in the party in many ways, as a party of believing in individual rights, individual responsibilities, no government intrusion, except in this arena, and i think we can agree this is a deeply personal issue. it's one that should be made by women, their doctors, their families, and not by politicians. >> it becomes a little bit of a conflict when you argue for the right of individuals to make, you know, choices and then you start to limit those choices, which is the societial argument that you have. the question i have, to the point you just raised, alex, about how this generation as "the times" pointed out, are they diffusing the ultimate he message here, or conversation when they -- in the context of talking about reproductive routes or abort
. whether it's civil rights for african-americans or equality for women, or equality for the lgtb community. >> oh, my. he takes on the world and the internet in his new ebook, and he's going to join me live in the studio. you don't want to miss it. progresso this reduced sodium soup says it may help lower cholesterol, how does it work? you just have to eat it as part of your heart healthy diet. step 1. eat the soup. all those veggies and beans, that's what may help lower your cholesterol and -- well that's easy [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. gives you 1% cash back on all purchases, plus a 50% annual bonus. and everyone likes 50% more... [ midwestern/chicago accent ] cheddar! yeah! 50 percent more [yodeling] yodel-ay-ee-oo. 50% more flash. [ southern accent ] 50 percent more taters. that's where tots come from. [ male announcer ] the capital one cash rewards card gives you 1% cash back on every purchase plus a 50% annual bonus on the cash you earn. it's the card for people who like more cash. 50% more spy stuff. what's in your wallet? this car is too small. yeah. t
is getting high-profile, but unlikely support. one of the nation's oldest civil rights groups is taking a stand in support of beverage companies. the new york chapter of the naacp is backing a lawsuit to try and stop the city. hazel dukes the new york chapter president. >> it's not about race. >> it's about -- >> economic disparity and how the small business is being punished while we allow the big, corporate people, again, to have their own way. >> convenience stores like 7-eleven are exempt. the naacp argue that small and minority owned businesses will feel a disproportionate impact. nonhispanic blacks have the highest rates of obesity at 44%, followed by mexican americans at 39%. the naacp filed a legal brief, to say to tackle the public health crisis on obesity, it developed a holistic educational program, called project health. the funding for that according to the naacp's website is the coca-cola foundation, the philanthropic arm of the company. the new york chapter received $75,000 in the past two years. is there a conflict? >> absolutely not. >> if this was the first time coca-c
, the humiliation that i went through. it was -- it was the toughest four years i've ever had. and when civil rights took action, i -- oh, my gosh. tears of joy. i know that people after me can now participate in high school sports without going through the battle that i had to. >> tatiana, i think some people watching they don't understand how the government could sort of inject sbooits a school and say you must allow disabled athletes to compete equally with able-bodied athletes because athleticism is different. we have paralympics and olympics, special olympics and olympics, but what exactly can be done to change some of the nature of athletics in schools so that there isn't this complete segregation? >> well, you know, when i went into high school, it's about opportunity and it's about being involved with your peers. and it's really about educating that. whether you have a disability or not, everyone should be involved. and i think it's great that, you know, it's being taken into action into schools. you know, this opens up huge doors, you know. like people going to college right after high scho
nominated an anti-civil rights candidate in 1964 barry goldwater, and since then has not cracked 20% with the black vote. i'm wondering if just now finally after all these years maybe getting on board with an immigration reform policy do you think that gets you anywhere where you are right now with the latino vote or did that ship sail? >> you know i hope that it does. i'd have to tell you, actions -- i think people are waiting to see what we do. and my hope is that we are going to meet the expectations that people have of us. that this is a problem that we will solve. the american people are interested in solutions. they are just -- they're so tired and as am i of this kicking the can down the road and not having adult conversations if you will about some of these issues whether it's immigration, whether it is the out of control federal spending, whether it is the escalating rate of debt in this country. whether it is the fact that we have a health care system that is going to have to have some attention. and the immigration issue will become linked to the
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